Authentic Lessons for 21st Century Learning

Memes > GIFs

Inequalities With One Variable

Brittany VanCleave, Amber Stokes | Published: May 26th, 2022 by K20 Center

Summary

This lesson focuses on the relationship between a set of numbers and the constraints of the inequality. The goal is to find possible solutions for one-variable inequalities. Students will write, graph, and identify solutions of inequalities and connect them back to real-world scenarios when applicable. This lesson includes optional modifications for distance learning. Resources for use in Google Classroom are included.

Essential Question(s)

How can one-variable inequalities be used to represent relationships? 

Snapshot

Engage

Students engage in a card sort to match inequalities with situations.

Explore

Students explore possible solutions to inequalities with a t-chart and number lines.

Explain

Students discuss how they determined possible solutions and receive clarification on misconceptions about solving inequalities.

Extend

Students create an inequality meme that satisfies two conditions.

Evaluate

Students complete an exit ticket to determine which student made a mistake solving the inequality.

Materials

  • Lesson presentation slides (seventh grade and pre-algebra)

  • Card sort handout (seventh grade and pre-algebra)

  • "What Numbers Work?" (seventh grade and pre-algebra)

  • Exit ticket handout (seventh grade and pre-algebra)

  • Internet-connected devices for student access to meme generator website: https://imgflip.com/memegenerator

Engage

Display the slideshow and introduce the lesson title on slide one: Memes > GIFs. To engage the students, start with a poll related to this title. Ask the students to raise their hands if they think memes are greater (or better) than GIFs. Then ask the students to raise their hands if they think GIFs are greater than memes.

Briefly introduce the lesson's Essential Question on slide three: How can one-variable inequalities be used to represent relationships? Ask students to work in pairs to complete the attached Card Sort strategy that involves matching various scenarios with one-variable inequalities. Allow about five minutes for this activity before asking partner pairs to find another pair of students to compare answers. Instruct the groups to discuss how they determined the matches by asking the other pair guiding questions like "Why did you put those two cards together?" or "How do you know the inequality sign is correct?"

Explore

Go to slide six. With students still in pairs, pass out the "What Numbers Work?" handout. Ask students to make a list of possible numbers that work for the given inequality and also numbers that do not work. Encourage students to discuss their reasoning with their partner. Once a list is compiled, students will show the numbers that work on the number line. This activity allows students to visualize what it means to graph the inequality. Students will then answer the question, "Why do certain numbers not fit?"

Explain

Seventh Grade Lesson: Go to slide eight. Staying in pairs, have pairs again partner with another pair for further discussion. Ask groups to reflect on their findings from the "What Numbers Work?" handout.

Pose the question shown on slide nine to the entire class: How can you solve the following problem without creating a table? X - 3 < 15

Continue to slides 10 and 11, and have students try the problem on the slide. Slide 10 displays a problem for students to try on their own. Slide 11 contains a challenge question to further understanding. Clarify misconceptions as students are solving and graphing.

Pre-Algebra Lesson: Display slide eight. This slide includes the steps for solving inequalities.

Continue to slide nine. Ask the class to help you list the similarities and differences between solving equations and solving inequalities on the board. You can type their responses directly into the slide show.

For slides 10 and 11, have students try the problem on the slide. Slide 10 displays a problem for students to try on their own. Slide 11 contains a challenge question to further understanding. Clarify misconceptions as students are solving and graphing.

Extend

Display slide 13. Ask students to create a meme that either represents one of the situations from the card sort in the Engage section of the lesson or a scenario that they invent on their own (with your approval). Students will use their internet-connected devices to access the Meme Generator (the full URL is listed in the resources below). An example is shown on the slide.

Display the memes around the room by having students leave their meme up on the screen. Have students complete a Gallery Walk strategy to view the creations of other students.

Evaluate

Introduce an Exit Ticket strategy and distribute a copy of the attached handout to each student. Ask them to determine which student in the examples shown got the incorrect answer and justify the rationale behind their choice. Collect the exit tickets at the end of class. The exit tickets will help you evaluate the students' understanding of the lesson so you can clarify any remaining misconceptions about solving inequalities.

Resources